Archive for July, 2004

July 28, 2004

DNC

Many people are asking why I’m not in Boston this week, so here’s why.

First, I don’t expect there to be any news there.

Second, neither the party or the shadow convention invited me. Unlike George W. Bush, I don’t go where I’m not wanted.

Third, I just got back from the San Diego Comicon and wanted to rest up.

July 28, 2004

DNC

Many people are asking why I’m not in Boston this week, so here’s why.

First, I don’t expect there to be any news there.

Second, neither the party or the shadow convention invited me. Unlike George W. Bush, I don’t go where I’m not wanted.

Third, I just got back from the San Diego Comicon and wanted to rest up.

July 28, 2004

West Coast Book Signings

It looks like I’ll be hitting the West Coast to sign WAKE UP, YOU’RE LIBERAL and GENERALISSIMO EL BUSHO during late October. Cities on the agenda include:

San Diego

Los Angeles

Santa Cruz

San Francisco/Berkeley

Portland

Seattle

Vancouver

Boise (maybe)

If you live in one of those cities and have a contact with a good independent or chain bookstore that might be interested in having me sign then, please email me at chet@rall.com.

I’ll do other appearances along the way, including speaking and/or showing comics, so if you have a good venue and guaranteed decent attendance (i.e., good promotion), please let me know.

July 28, 2004

West Coast Book Signings

It looks like I’ll be hitting the West Coast to sign WAKE UP, YOU’RE LIBERAL and GENERALISSIMO EL BUSHO during late October. Cities on the agenda include:

San Diego

Los Angeles

Santa Cruz

San Francisco/Berkeley

Portland

Seattle

Vancouver

Boise (maybe)

If you live in one of those cities and have a contact with a good independent or chain bookstore that might be interested in having me sign then, please email me at chet@rall.com.

I’ll do other appearances along the way, including speaking and/or showing comics, so if you have a good venue and guaranteed decent attendance (i.e., good promotion), please let me know.

July 28, 2004

Patience is a Virtue

If you’re waiting for your copy of EL BUSHO, fear not–I’m not running a cash scam here. I’m waiting for a fresh box of hardback EL BUSHOs from my publisher so I can send them out. Your books will likely go out early next week.

July 28, 2004

Patience is a Virtue

If you’re waiting for your copy of EL BUSHO, fear not–I’m not running a cash scam here. I’m waiting for a fresh box of hardback EL BUSHOs from my publisher so I can send them out. Your books will likely go out early next week.

July 23, 2004

The Death Threat Guy

He called back! “Saw your web [sic],” the fascist said, “but it don’t bother me none. We know where you are, and we’re comin’ to git you.”

He’s still at the same number.

July 23, 2004

The Death Threat Guy

He called back! “Saw your web [sic],” the fascist said, “but it don’t bother me none. We know where you are, and we’re comin’ to git you.”

He’s still at the same number.

July 23, 2004

Update to This Week’s Column

There’s an interesting development in the Jack Idema case, the subject of this week’s syndicated column. Idema is the ex-Special Forces soldier arrested for running a private torture chamber in Kabul.

As the invaluable Asia Times reported:

During a press briefing on Wednesday at the US State Department, spokesman Richard Boucher repeated that the United States had had no official contact with Jonathan Idema, the leader of three US civilians on trial in Afghanistan accused of kidnapping and torturing suspected Afghan resistance fighters.

“That’s their story now,” I wrote. That story is already changing. Now they admit that Idema wasn’t quite as “off the reservation” as the Pentagon would like us to believe. Sez the BBC:

The US military has admitted it detained an Afghan man handed over by a US citizen accused of running a freelance counter-terrorism operation.

A military spokesman said the prisoner was handed over by the American, Jonathan K Idema, in May.

A BBC correspondent in Kabul says that the disclosure is embarrassing for the US, which said it had had no links with the alleged American mercenary. “We did receive a detainee from Idema or his party,” said Major Jon Siepmann, spokesman for the coalition forces. “The reason we received this person was that we believed that he was someone that we had identified as a potential terrorist and we wanted him for questioning,” he said. But forces strenuously deny that Idema was working for the military in any official capacity and insist that he is a mercenary. They argue that they were not aware of Idema’s “full track record” prior to his arrest earlier this month along with two other Americans and four Afghans.

Don’t be surprised if it ultimately turns out that Idema was on the books after all. Should that happen, neither he or we should hold our breath for an apology.

Nor should the three innocent Afghans found hanging by their feet in Idema’s home.

July 23, 2004

Update to This Week’s Column

There’s an interesting development in the Jack Idema case, the subject of this week’s syndicated column. Idema is the ex-Special Forces soldier arrested for running a private torture chamber in Kabul.

As the invaluable Asia Times reported:

During a press briefing on Wednesday at the US State Department, spokesman Richard Boucher repeated that the United States had had no official contact with Jonathan Idema, the leader of three US civilians on trial in Afghanistan accused of kidnapping and torturing suspected Afghan resistance fighters.

“That’s their story now,” I wrote. That story is already changing. Now they admit that Idema wasn’t quite as “off the reservation” as the Pentagon would like us to believe. Sez the BBC:

The US military has admitted it detained an Afghan man handed over by a US citizen accused of running a freelance counter-terrorism operation.

A military spokesman said the prisoner was handed over by the American, Jonathan K Idema, in May.

A BBC correspondent in Kabul says that the disclosure is embarrassing for the US, which said it had had no links with the alleged American mercenary. “We did receive a detainee from Idema or his party,” said Major Jon Siepmann, spokesman for the coalition forces. “The reason we received this person was that we believed that he was someone that we had identified as a potential terrorist and we wanted him for questioning,” he said. But forces strenuously deny that Idema was working for the military in any official capacity and insist that he is a mercenary. They argue that they were not aware of Idema’s “full track record” prior to his arrest earlier this month along with two other Americans and four Afghans.

Don’t be surprised if it ultimately turns out that Idema was on the books after all. Should that happen, neither he or we should hold our breath for an apology.

Nor should the three innocent Afghans found hanging by their feet in Idema’s home.